Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Sports Medicine and Fitness Barcelona, Spain.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Ahmad Alkhatib

Dasman Diabetes Institute, Kuwait

Keynote: Exercise intensity for health and sports performance: recent updates

Time : 9:00-9:30

OMICS International Sports Medicine 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ahmad Alkhatib photo
Biography:

Professor Alkhatib is the Head of Epidemiology and Public Health at Dasman Diabetes Institute, Kuwait, following his move from the UK, where he headed and developed several programs in Sport Science, physical activity, nutrition and health at the universities of Sheffield Hallam, Greenwich, Lincoln, Suffolk, Essex and Abertay Dundee. He earned his PhD in Sport Science (Exercise Physiology and Metabolism) and MSc in (Health and Fitness) from the University of Essex, and is a Fellow of the UK Higher Education Academy (FHEA), an accredited UK nutritionist (RNutr), a clinical physiologist, a Fellow of Royal Society of Medicine, and a certified international sports nutritionist (CISSN). The research of Dr Alkhatib focuses on developing effective physical activity and nutritional strategies to 

Abstract:

Sport and physical activity prescription guidelines continue to evolve, which helps responding to a global epidemic of obesity, diabetes and several other lifestyle diseases, and addressing sports performance needs. Individualized exercise prescription should consider human physiological and behavioral adaptations and long term adherence. The intensity, duration and mode of exercise all determine the effectiveness and adherence of exercise training in the short and long term. Exercise or physical activity intensity prescription is considered one of the most important determinants for both health and sport related outcomes because of its complex effects on human cardiometabolic, neurological and psychological responses. Exercise training effectiveness can be defined based on several markers or thresholds at maximal and submaximal levels, including oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, blood metabolites, and perceived physical exertion, all affected by how intense the exercise is. Unfortunately, blurred definitions of exercise intensity prescription have recently surfaced including high-intensity or supramaximal high-intensity training (HIT or S-HIT). Some suggest HIT as a “novel” method for exercise training based on several findings showing short term-effectiveness in selected populations, which has been swiftly recommended by some as a public health strategy. Inaccurate exercise intensity prescription can be counterproductive, and increases the injury risk of and affect exercise adherence. Perhaps the history of exercise science associated with intensity domains including HIT can be traced back to early physiology work of 1920s. Since then, it had been known that exercise intensity domains are defined as light, moderate, heavy, severe, maximal and supramaximal intensities. Each domain is associated with complex adaptive responses, so HIT is not novel after all. A careful understanding of exercise intensity prescription necessitates an individualized exercise prescription in order to enable exercise scientists and sports medicine professionals to accurately address populations’ health and sporting outcomes.

Keynote Forum

Dagmar Pavlu

Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic

Keynote: Elastic resistance training

Time : 9:30-10:00

OMICS International Sports Medicine 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dagmar Pavlu photo
Biography:

Dagmar Pavlů is working as an Associate Professor at Charles University in Prague (Czech Republic) and is a Head of Department of Physiotherapy of FTVS. She completed her Master’s degree in Physiotherapy and PhD in Pedagogy in 1995. In 2005, she became an Associate Professor in Exercise Physiology. She was President of the professional organisation of Physiotherapists of the Czech Republic. From 2004  to 2008, she served as a Vice Chairman of ER-WCPT. Her current research interests include analysis of the effect of physiotherapeutical methods. She has published over 150 publications.

Abstract:

Elastic resistance training can be used not only for typical strengthening training but can support training or recovery process by different ways. Areas, in which can be used elastic resistance training with Sanctband, as one of most modern devices, will be presented and documented by examples of research. Focus will be given on demonstration of various workouts and strength training in sports and therapy, endurance training in sports and therapy, procedures to increase muscle stretch and expand the scope of joint mobility, coordination or training exercises, speed ability or training exercises, exercises to improve stability, general exercises or specific training for sports, exercises for the handicapped, exercises for children, exercises in pairs or groups and on water exercises

Keynote Forum

Jan Heller

Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic

Keynote: Physical fitness profile in professional bodyguards

Time : 10:00-10:30

OMICS International Sports Medicine 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jan Heller photo
Biography:

Jan Heller has completed his PhD from the 1st Medical Faculty of the Charles University in Prague and Postdoctoral studies from Pierre-and-Marie-Curie University, France. He is the Head of Biomedical Laboratory at the Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic. He has published more than 200 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member.

Abstract:

Profession of bodyguard may induce a high level of psychophysiological stress and calls for high demands both for mental and physical capacities. The aim of the study was to describe health related data and physical fitness levels in a group of professional bodyguards of governmental and constitutional officials (n=21, age 37.5 years, range 28.6 to 54.5 years). Body composition was measured by using by bio-impedance method (Tanita Mc-980MA), muscular strength was determined by the grip strength dynamometer (Takei T.K.K.5401 Grip D), muscular power was assessed by the completion of the Wingate cycle test and cardiorespiratory fitness was determined by the completion of a VO2 peak test on a cycle ergometer. In addition, the subjects were examined for blood pressure, blood cholesterol and they were tested for simple visual and acoustic reaction time. The bodyguards demonstrated body fat 18.3+/-4.0 % and a high amount of fat-free mass 73.9+/-6.8 kg that corresponds to 109% and 114% of the national population norms. Body mass index attained 26.8+/-2.6 kg.m(-2) that corresponds to 104% of the population norm. Their grip strength attained 58.8+/-9.6 kp and 58.8+/-7.7 kp for the right and left hand, respectively. Those values corresponded to 120 % and 120% of the norm. Peak power and mean power found in the 30s Wingate test (resistance load 10% of body mass) were 992.1+/-120 W and 815.0+/-99 W, respectively, and the relative values of peak power and mean power attained 11.0+/-1.1 W/kg and 9.0+/-0.9 W/kg. VO2 peak reached 48.0+/-5.4 ml.kg(-1).min(-1) and the peak power output 3.58+/0.39 W/kg, that correspond to 126% and 105% of the national population norms. The average systolic and diastolic blood pressure attained 130.3+/-15.1 and 83.8+/-7 torr, respectively. High blood pressure (above 140/90) demonstrated six from 21 participants (i.e., 29%). Level of blood cholesterol was 4.54+/-0.79 mmol.l(-1) and the increased concentrations (above 5.2 mmol.l(-1)) was found in five from 21 participants (i.e. 24%).The simple visual and acoustic reaction time attained 207.8+/-12.9 ms and 156.0+/-16.9 ms that correspond to 109% and 92% of the national population norms. Peak power and mean power found in the 30s Wingate test and VO2 peak values correlated negatively with age (r=-0.57; -0.56; -0.47; p< 0.05). However, blood pressure, blood cholesterol, reaction time and handgrip values were not negatively affected by age. Body fat percentage negatively correlated with the aerobic fitness indices (VO2 peak r=-0.53, p<0.05; power output r=-0.63; p<0.01) but the main indices of anaerobic performance and other parameters followed in the study were not affected by the percentage of body fat. In conclusion, professional bodyguards could be regarded as individuals exposed to stress and to the consequent health risks. On the other hand, they exhibit above average both anaerobic and aerobic physical fitness that may provide beneficial health effects.